Why Shortcuts Are Bad, and Head Starts Are Good

Dali didn't take shortcuts to create his art, and neither should you.
Dali didn’t take shortcuts to create his art, and neither should you.

In business, everyone wants to grow as quickly as possible. This imperative leads many people down the dark path of shortcutting.

Shortcuts mean faking your way to the top.

Shortcuts mean cutting corners and ignoring important details.

Shortcuts mean stealing other people’s work and passing it off as your own.

Shortcuts inevitably lead to failure, because sooner or later, you’ll be exposed as a phony. If you never put in the hard work needed to build a real foundation, everyone will know it.

In contrast, head starts are virtuous ways to build your company, your personal brand, or your career.

Head starts mean borrowing other people’s equity (with their permission) to build credibility.

Head starts mean studying your market and being prepared before presenting something to potential customers.

Head starts mean acknowledging that a small piece of something big is better than a big piece of something small.

Head starts inevitably lead to success because they give you a leg up on your competition without sacrificing your integrity or authenticity.

One thought on “Why Shortcuts Are Bad, and Head Starts Are Good

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